Hot dang tomboy bikers! The badass builders of British Customs have done it again with motorcycle lifestyle brand, The Death Collective with their wicked collab, Pamela, their ‘deadly’ take on British motorbiking classic, the Triumph Scrambler. Check this hot mama out below and the story behind it.

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   THE PAMELA TRIUMPH SCRAMBLER BUILD BY THE DEATH COLLECTIVE x BRITISH CUSTOMS FLAMES IT UP IN THIS VIDEO

The Triumph Scrambler is a British motorcycle made by Triumph Motorcycles but it certainly doesn’t sip tea like a puny granny with scones and sandwiches on the side. Are you effing kidding us?! This build will eat you up whole and spit you out on the other side. For real!

Lauded as a British motorbiking classic, this legend is still, surprisingly, a child, having been launched just a decade back in 2006. It was the last Triumph styled by designer John Mockett, who had begun working with the small factory team at Triumph in 1989.

Triumph Scrambler Hell on Wheels by The Death Collective and British Customs Tomboy Tarts

   THE PAMELA TRIUMPH SCRAMBLER IS BAD TO THE BONE. PHOTO BY ©BRITISH CUSTOMS

Now all that has gone bad to the bone, thanks to The Death Collective, a motorcycle lifestyle movement based out of Australia built around using bikes to bring people together, who have given a new spin on the bike’s classic design.

They teamed up with the badass builders of British Customs, one of the UK’s premier custom bike builders, to create Pamela, a one-of-a-kind Triumph Scrambler that spits pure fire when ignited.

Triumph Scrambler Hell on Wheels by The Death Collective and British Customs Tomboy Tarts

   THIS TRIUMPH SCRAMBLER HAS ZERO FABRICATION. PHOTO BY ©BRITISH CUSTOMS

The idea behind the collab was simple: Create a motorcycle that is 100% D.I.Y. with ZERO FABRICATION.

With a big list of visual and performance upgrades, this 2015 Triumph Scrambler has been transformed into a purpose-built ‘fun machine’ that’s built to be thrashed and rock and rolled on roads, dirt, track, beaches. Anywhere and everywhere.

Triumph Scrambler Hell on Wheels by The Death Collective and British Customs Tomboy Tarts

   TAKE THIS BABY AND RIDE ANY SURFACE YOU WANT. PHOTO BY ©BRITISH CUSTOMS x THE DEATH COLLECTIVE

The Death Collective proudly claim on their site that “the work was carried out by a complete novice mechanic, using basic tools, in a home garage. Almost all the parts in this build are ‘plug-and-play’ and were super easy to install thanks to the ‘how-to’ videos and guides up on the British Customs blog.”

Max Duff, founder of The Death Collective did an interview with British Customs to elaborate further about their ‘deadly collaboration’.

British Customs : What is the Death Collective way of life? 
Max Duff: It’s different for every person. Some guys like going fast. Others like doing huge wheelies. For me, it’s all about having fun with my friends. It’s basically an escape from normal life — a reset button on reality. I spend so much time confined indoors due to work and motorcycles allow me to get outside and be immersed in my surroundings. Everything looks, smells, and sounds better on a motorcycle. As soon as the helmet goes on, you’re in a different world completely. The only thing I’ve found that comes close to this feeling of complete immersion is surfing and snowboarding. The biggest difference, however, is the sense of freedom and pride that comes with owning a motorcycle.

Triumph Scrambler Hell on Wheels by The Death Collective and British Customs Tomboy Tarts

   MAX DUFF, FOUNDER OF THE DEATH COLLECTIVE SITS PRETTY ON HIS PAMELA TRIUMPH SCRAMBLER. PHOTO BY ©BRITISH CUSTOMS

BC: What has it meant to you to customize your own bike? 
MD: I’m a creative person, so for me personally, wrenching is a chance to create something that reflects who I am. It’s a really rewarding feeling. I guess since I’m being interviewed I have to be perfectly honest: what got me into design was this video game I played as a kid called Motocross Madness. I would go in and change all the bikes and create whatever I wanted and ride it in the game. Even as a young teenager, it was rewarding to be able to see something in your head come to life, and to have someone else see it and get it. Nearly 15 years later I’m still doing the same thing, but on real bikes.
Triumph Scrambler Hell on Wheels by The Death Collective and British Customs Tomboy Tarts

   BEFORE & AFTER CUSTOMIZATION OF THE PAMELA. PHOTO BY ©WWW.MATMACMEDIA.COM

BC: How has your experience as a rider improved by working on your own bike? 
MD: Bikes aren’t like cars: if it breaks down, it’s extra important you know what’s going on, and that you’re aware of what state it’s in. When you get to work on a bike you get to know every part of it. You’re more connected to it. When you hear a little rattle, you know it’s this or that. It becomes an extension of your body. If you hop on someone else’s bike that you haven’t worked on, it feels different. Wrenching inspires a different kind of confidence in both you and your bike.

 


To read the rest of this killer interview, head on down to the British Customs site here or if you want more info on this build, jump on the @british_customs Instagram account or visit their website @ www.british-customs.com

Once you get inspired, call us. We’re more than happy to hop on your killer ride ladies as we go flame up some super rockin’ highways man!

h/t British Customs